Neck disorders are common issues for office workers that use computers often.

1. Definition

  • One of the most common poor postures
  • the muscles of the shoulders, neck, and chest have become deformed.

The back muscles of the neck and shoulders become strained and the muscles in the front of the chest become tight. These overactive muscles cause surrounding counter muscles to become underused and weakened.

2. Causes

Different movements can cause upper crossed syndrome, but most cases develop through poor posture, specifically sitting or standing with the head forward for prolonged periods.

Activities that promote this postural position include:

  • computer and laptop use
  • driving
  • watching TV
  • cellphone browsing, texting, app, or game use
  • reading
  • biking

In some cases, injury or congenital disabilities may also contribute to the development or creation of the condition.

3. Symptoms

Common characteristics of upper crossed syndrome include:

 

4. Self-Check Up for Round back with Forward Head

  • Floor angel

https://www.gettoyourcore.com/cps-self-test-upper-crossed/

  • Neck Forward self test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5rz9P5UMxI

check muscle tension: UT, SCM, C7 spinous process pop-up, sagittal line check, ear lob to shoulder straight

  • Self test for forward head posture

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eD0mpvH0gYI

check gap between head and wall: check inch

  • Thumb test (Quick rounded shoulder test)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mL5Lf9tFIo8

5. Treatment for Round Back with Forward Head

1) Self-Treatment/ Prevention

Stretching Program

Stretching 1: Suboccipitalis

  1. Sit with your chest up and looking straight ahead.
  2. Gently push your chin back while looking straight ahead(so that you have a double chin)
  3. Keep your head upright, don’t look up or down. Keep eyes facing forward.
  4. While holding your chin back with one hand, use your other hand to reach over the top of your head.
  5. Stabilize your chin back as you gently pull the top of your head forward.

 

Stretching 2: Upper trapezius

While keeping one shouder down, bend your head towards your opposite shoulder. Use pressure with your hand if needed.

 

Stretching 3: Levator scapula

  1. Sit up straight on a chair
  2. Put your hand up over your shoulder and bring your elbow back, pointing your elbow up to the ceiling
  3. Rotate your head a little bit and bend forward your head.
  4. Give extra pressure with opposite hand to pull your head forward.

 

Stretching 4: Pectoralis (major and minor)

  1. Stand next to a wall or bar, extending your arm along it
  2. Rotate your body away
  3. Begin by lying on your side, crossing one leg over the other and bending the upper leg to 90 degrees
  4. Extend both arms at your side straight away from your body
  5. Start the movement by looking back over your shoulder and rotating your top arm towards your backside.
  6. Gently attempt to bring that arm to the floor, hold momentarily and return to the start position

  1. Begin by lying on your side, crossing one leg over the other and bending the upper leg to 90 degrees
  2. Extend both arms at your side straight away from your body
  3. Start the movement by looking back over your shoulder and rotating your top arm towards your backside.
  4. Gently attempt to bring that arm to the floor, hold momentarily and return to the start position

 

Stretching 5: SCM

  1. With your arms crossed hold the towel firmly to your chest
  2. Other hand has towel pressed against your check bone
  3. Pull the towel across your checkbone with the towel doing the work and your neck feeling the stretch

  1. Tilt head as far as possible to right
  2. Turn face into shoulder ten up again, maintain the side-bending position

 

Stretching 6: Scalenus

  1. Sit with your chest up forward on the edge of a chair.
  2. Hold the leg or seat of the chair tightly with one hand to keep the ribs down.
  3. Sideflex your head to the opposite side without flexing your head forward.
  4. You may find you get more of a stretch if you rotate your head slightly toward the hand that is holding onto the chair and slightly extend your neck as you sideflex

 

 

Stretching  7: Latissimus dorsi

  1. Stand with feet shoulder width apart, chest up and head back over your shoulders.
  2. Raise the right arm over head and grab your right wrist with the left hand.
  3. Pull your right wrist over to the left gently and bend your trunk to the left until a comfortable stretch is felt.
  4. Hold this for 30 – 60 seconds.
  5. Repeat this on the other side.

 

Stretching  8: Upper-extremity flexors

  1. With your elbow straight, palm facing up in the wall
  2. Press your hand toward the wall
  3. Hold this for 30 – 60 seconds.

 

 Strengthening program

Strengthening 1: Deep cervical flexors (longs colli and capitis)

  1. With your back against the wall, tuck your chin as if nodding “yes” to a question and keeping the back of your head against the surface behind you
  2. Make sure the superficial muscles on your neck are not active during the exercise

 

Strengthening 2: Middle/Lower trapezius

 

Strengthening 3: Serratus anterior

 

Strengthening 4: Upper-extremity extensors and supinator

2) Professional Treatment

FLEXIBILITY:  Stretch muscles, protect against injury and allow the maximum range of motion for joints

ISOMETRIC:  Muscle does not shorten but tension increases

ISOTONIC:  Muscle shortens and movement occurs

CLOSED-CHAIN: the hand (for arm movement) or foot (for leg movement) is fixed in space and cannot move.

INSTRUMENT ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION

a set of hand held instruments to break down the scar tissue and fascial restrictions in soft tissues (muscles, ligaments, tendons, fascia, and nerves).

Fascia serves as the connective tissue scaffolding between cells and provides support and stability to joints and muscle tissue.Fascia connects muscles in chains, making full body movement possible

 

NEURAC METHOD

restore functional and pain-free movement patterns through high levels of neuromuscular stimulation. The Neurac treatment focuses on muscle interaction and the cause of the problems, not just the symptoms.